Stanza overview in stopping by woods on a snowy evening

In that case, it is 21st or 22nd December, when the winter solstice occurs in the northern hemisphere. The woods for the narrators are immensely thick, dark and stand in all their glory.

Ring, rhyme and reason flows systematically throughout the poem. On the other hand, it could be an undertone to the poet wishing his death to be nearby, giving him solace in its fold. As a popular interpretation contests, the narrator contemplates a burning desire to die within the woods, unnoticed and unsung.

The poet is miles from anywhere, buried deep in the woods where the only sound is that wind and snowflakes falling.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Summary

One is tempted to read it, nod quietly in recognition of its splendor and multivalent meaning, and just move on. It also happens to mark the beginning of winter. The narrator voices his concern about losing his way through the woods since it gets immensely dark at night-time, he decides to better get a move on.

As the verse indicates, the poet is bypassing the forest. May be the narrator-traveller was very depressed due to his long journey or the cold weather.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening: Summary

It stands alone and beautiful, the account of a man stopping by woods on a snowy evening, but gives us a come-hither look that begs us to load it with a full inventory of possible meanings. More so, the poet paints an image, etched in natural beauty, drawing deep sensory emotions from the reader.

On the whole, the rhyming convention follows aaba-bbcb-ccdc-dddd convention. But the speaker, the rider, the contemplative man on the horse, the would-be suicide, is already committed to his ongoing life.

Does this poem express a death wish, considered and then discarded? If the woods are not particularly wicked, they still possess the seed of the irrational; and they are, at night, dark—with all the varied connotations of darkness. They make a strong claim to be the most celebrated instance of repetition in English poetry.

For example, in the third stanza, queer,near, and year all rhyme, but lake rhymes with shake,mistake, and flake in the following stanza. Here sits the rider on his horse in what appears to be inhospitable countryside, staying too long, thinking too much?

The speaker is stopping by some woods on a snowy evening. What do woods represent? He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The last two lines are the true culprits.

The woods are blanketed in thick snow, amplifying its beauty factor. Or does the poem merely describe the temptation to sit and watch beauty while responsibilities are forgotten—to succumb to a mood for a while? Within the four lines of each stanza, the first, second, and fourth lines rhyme.

The poet is torn between two choices yet again, to head home or sink in the scenic view. Yet the intensity of the winter cold has rendered the lake frozen.

Line 8 The darkest evening of the year. This indicates that he is enjoying the scene and wants to do so for long. Since the poet is still afar from his house, he now contemplates on his life ahead, focusing on the imminent end of the road awaiting him. Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening Analysis Stanza 1 The poet begins the poem, which you can read herewith his questioner approach, intentionally wondering that these woods seemed familiar to him at some point in time.

Otherwise it may also refer to the longest night of the year — the night with the most hours of darkness. In effect, this is one long sentence, the syntax unbroken by punctuation. As an exception, in the last stanza, all four lines are rhyming though.

The only other sounds the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. And the important thing here is that the poet repeats the last line to attract the attention of the readers. All the lines flow, there is no punctuation to create pauses caesurasuggesting a continuation of life, a smooth familiar routine.Overview.

Frost wrote the poem in June at his house in Shaftsbury, Vermont.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

He had been up the entire night writing the long poem "New Hampshire" and had finally finished when he realized morning had come. He went out to view the sunrise and suddenly got the idea for "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening". The woods are lovely, dark, and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, 15 And miles to go before I sleep.

Summary. On the surface, this poem is simplicity itself. The speaker is stopping by some woods on a snowy evening. The poem, Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening, explores the motivations of the poet, the inherent moods of the narrator and his fixation with woods for an inner reason.

A maestro of rhyming within conforms, Robert Frost is known as a ‘regional poet’. Summary of Stanza I (Lines ) of the poem Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening. Line-by-line analysis. Like the woods it describes, the poem is lovely but entices us with dark depths—of interpretation, in this case.

It stands alone and beautiful, the account of a man stopping by woods on a snowy evening, but gives us a come-hither look that begs us to load it with a full inventory of possible meanings. Whose woods these are I think I know. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening By Robert Frost. Whose woods these are I think I know.

His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow.

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Stanza overview in stopping by woods on a snowy evening
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